Via: sevdolo
Via: sevdolo
daftpiink:

where i need to be

daftpiink:

where i need to be

historicaltimes:

Photograph shows surgeons around a person on the operating table with medical staff gathered nearby, and with spectators, medical students?, seated in the background in the clinic amphitheater. Professor William W. Keen’s Clinic, Jefferson Medical College Hospital, December 10th, 1902.

historicaltimes:

Photograph shows surgeons around a person on the operating table with medical staff gathered nearby, and with spectators, medical students?, seated in the background in the clinic amphitheater. Professor William W. Keen’s Clinic, Jefferson Medical College Hospital, December 10th, 1902.

July

On tonight’s Live, Interactive, Worldwide broadcast!

I have Pentagon Official, Alex Plitsas, on with us to try to cut through the media bias of both sides of the latest Israel vs/ Palestine showdown.

And, if we have time, fielding your questions on the downed Malaysian flight over the Ukraine.

Dont miss it! Live on www.ZenLive.tv

sosocheeky:

Imagine?!

sosocheeky:

Imagine?!

sosocheeky:

No way?!

sosocheeky:

No way?!

thinksquad:

From the corner pharmacy to the operating room, drug shortages are occurring nationwide, forcing healthcare professionals to make changes in their treatments, even in critical emergency care situations.

Oral drugs may suddenly become unavailable for weeks. Some have been in short supply for several years. Anesthesiologists often run short on common anesthetic drugs. When these shortages occur, physicians and pharmacists have to change drug treatments, recalculate doses, or even postpone treatments.

Surprisingly, the drugs that are in short supply are rarely high-ticket treatments. Instead, they are usually inexpensive generics. Drug wholesalers, and then pharmacies, run out of ordinary medications like atorvastatin (a statin drug used to prevent formation of cholesterol in the body), bupropion (an antidepressant), pantoprazole (used to block stomach acid and treat reflux or indigestion), and B-12 injection (cyanocobalamin, which helps the body produce red blood cells). Patients may wait for weeks to get a new supply of a common drug.

http://www.healthline.com/health-news/shortages-of-prescription-drugs-reported-072114

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